Tom Ramsey
Professor
956-4666
PSB 410 


Computing Angular Kronecker Constants (joint work with Kathryn Hare)

Papers about Kronecker Constants (updated May 2, 2014)
co-authored with Kathryn Hare (University of Waterloo)

A New Paper in Statistics (July, 2011)

Two recent papers co-authored with Colin C. Graham:

Spring 2014
Course Links
Math 321
9:30-10:20
MWF
Please see the department web page for the course description and the departmental syllabus.
Math 203
1:30-2:20
MWF
 Please see the department web pages for the course description and the departmental syllabus.  Here is the course syllabus for this particular course.
The course ID for purchasing access to MyMathLab is ramsey33296
Math 242
9:00-10:15
Tu-Thur
These are sections 7 and 8, with separate labs on Mondays.  Please see the department web pages for the course description and the departmental syllabus.  Here is the course syllabus for this particular course (in PDF format).  
Suggested homework for Section 7.1:  problems 13-18 and 40-43.  
Suggested homework for Section 7.2:  2, 4, 22, 24, 34, 36, 42, 44, 46, 54, 62, 64, 66, and 68.
Suggested homework for Section 7.3:  1 to 121.  Try to do as many as possible.   Maybe start with every sixth one, to get an overview of the possibilities.  Do more of any type that cause you difficulty.
Suggested homework for Section 7.4:  1 to 100.  Try to do as many as possible.  They are arranged in bunches of a similar type.  Try some from each type.  If you have trouble with that type, do more there.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller, somewhere (an empty classrom I hope), to answer questions SUNDAY, Jan. 26 at 4:30.  If no one is there, I'll head home at 4:45.
Suggested homework for Section 7.5:  Sample problems 1-8 to test your understanding of when y(x) solves a particular DE; sample problems 9-18 to test your understanding of separable DEs.  Sample problems 19 to 41 to test your understanding of DE's that are y'=ky or closely related to y'=ky (like Newton's law of cooling).
Suggested homework for Section 7.6.  Sample problems from 1 to 63.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions from 4:30 to 6:30 pm on Sunday, Feb. 2.  The quizzes on Feb. 3 will cover Sections 7.4 and 7.5.
Suggested homework for Section 16.2:  problems 1-20 and 25-30.  This chapter is available for free at www.pearsonhighered.com/thomas
The following link at UHM has the answers for odd-numbered problems from Chapters 16 and 17:  http://www.math.hawaii.edu/~marvin/302/16.17.UC.textbook.pdf
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions from 4:30 to 6:30 pm on Sunday, Feb. 9.  The quizzes on Feb. 10 will cover Sections 7.6 and 16.2.
Suggest homework for Section 8.1:  problems 1-30, 33-36 and 39-46.
Suggested homework for Section 8.2 (first and second day on it):  problems 1-38.
Suggested homework for Section 8.3:  problems 1-42.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions from 4:30 to 6:30 on Sunday, Feb. 23.  The quizzes on Feb. 24 will cover Sections 8.2 and 8.3.  To this quiz you can bring an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of paper with notes on both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 8.4:  problems 1-46.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions 4:30 to 6:30 on Sunday, March 2.  The quizzes on March 3 will cover Section 8.4.  To this quiz you can bring an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of paper with notes on both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 8.7:  problems 1-72.  We worked on problems 1-34 in class on Tuesday, March 11.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, March 16, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on March 17 will cover Section 8.7.  To this quiz you can bring an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of paper with notes on both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 9.1:  problems 1-84.  There is a quiz on this section in the labs on Monday, March 31.  An 8.5 inch by 11 inch cheat sheet is allowed, both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 9.2:  problems 1-58.
Suggested homework for Section 9.8:  problems 1-28.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 6, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on April 7 are based on Section 9.2 and 9.8.  An 8.5 inch by 11 inch cheat sheet is allowed for the quizzes.
Suggest homework for Section 9.9:  problems 1-34 (eventually).  As of April 8, you should be able to do problems with sin, cos and exp.
Suggested homework for Section 9.3:  problems 1-32.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 13, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on April 14 are based on Section 9.3 and 9.9.  An 8.5 inch by 11 inch cheat sheet is allowed.  In 9.9, focus on problems that involve sin, cos, and exp.
Suggested homework for 9.9 and 9.10:  you should be able to do 1-32 of 9.9 and 1-16 of 9.10.  In class we used Theorems 19 and 20 (pages 541-542 of Section 7) to differentiate and integrate power series and thus get some series for ln and for the inverse tangent function.  Problem 15 of 9.10 asks you to get series for the inverse sine and inverse cosine functions in a similar manner.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 20, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on Monday, April 21, cover 9.4 and 9.10.  The usual cheat sheet is allowed.  In 9.4 study problems 1-36.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 27, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on Monday, April 28, cover Sections 9.5 and 9.6.  Study problems 1-44 in 9.5 and 1-44 in 9.6.  The usual cheat sheet is allowed.
Suggested homework for Section 9.7:  problems 1-44.
Suggested homework problems in Chapter 9 for error estimation:  Section 9.3, problems 43 and 44; Section 9.6, problems 45-50; Section 9.9, problems 19-28, problems 42-43, problems 57-62.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, May 4, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on Monday, May 5, cover Section 9.7 and the three formulas for error estimation.  You can bring a one-page cheat sheet as before; with the quizzes there will be provided copies of the summaries of theorems about series (the same summary that was distributed in class).
Math 242
12:00-1:15
Tu-Thur
These are sections 7 and 8, with separate labs on Mondays.  Please see the department web pages for the course description and the departmental syllabus.  Here is the course syllabus for this particular course (in PDF format).  
Suggested homework for Section 7.1:  problems 13-18 and 40-43.  
Suggested homework for Section 7.2:  2, 4, 22, 24, 34, 36, 42, 44, 46, 54, 62, 64, 66, and 68.
Suggested homework for Section 7.3:  1 to 121.  Try to do as many as possible.   Maybe start with every sixth one, to get an overview of the possibilities.  Do more of any type that cause you difficulty.
Suggested homework for Section 7.4:  1 to 100.  Try to do as many as possible.  They are arranged in bunches of a similar type.  Try some from each type.  If you have trouble with that type, do more there.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller, somewhere (an empty classrom I hope), to answer questions SUNDAY, Jan. 26 at 4:30.  If no one is there, I'll head home at 4:45.
Suggested homework for Section 7.5:  Sample problems 1-8 to test your understanding of when y(x) solves a particular DE; sample problems 9-18 to test your understanding of separable DEs.  Sample problems 19 to 41 to test your understanding of DE's that are y'=ky or closely related to y'=ky (like Newton's law of cooling).
Suggested homework for Section 7.6.  Sample problems from 1 to 63.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions from 4:30 to 6:30 pm on Sunday, Feb. 2.  The quizzes on Feb. 10 will cover Sections 7.4 and 7.5.
Suggested homework for Section 16.2:  problems 1-20 and 25-30.  This chapter is available for free at www.pearsonhighered.com/thomas
The following link at UHM has the answers for odd-numbered problems from Chapters 16 and 17:  http://www.math.hawaii.edu/~marvin/302/16.17.UC.textbook.pdf
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions from 4:30 to 6:30 pm on Sunday, Feb. 9.  The quizzes on Feb. 10 will cover Sections 7.6 and 16.2.
Suggest homework for Section 8.1:  problems 1-30, 33-36 and 39-46.
Suggested homework for Section 8.2 (first and second day):  problems 1-38.
Suggested homework for Section 8.3:  problems 1-42.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions from 4:30 to 6:30 on Sunday, Feb. 23.  The quizzes on Feb. 24 will cover Sections 8.2 and 8.3.  To this quiz you can bring an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of paper with notes on both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 8.4:  problems 1-46.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions 4:30 to 6:30 on Sunday, March 2.  The quizzes on March 3 will cover Section 8.4.  To this quiz you can bring an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of paper with notes on both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 8.7:  problems 1-72.  We worked on problems 1-34 in class on Tuesday, March 11.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, March 16, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on March 17 will cover Section 8.7.  To this quiz you can bring an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of paper with notes on both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 9.1:  problems 1-84.   There is a quiz on this section in the labs on Monday, March 31.  An 8.5 inch by 11 inch cheat sheet is allowed, both sides.
Suggested homework for Section 9.2:  problems 1-58.
Suggested homework for Section 9.8:  problems 1-28.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 6, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on April 7 are based on Section 9.2 and 9.8.  An 8.5 inch by 11 inch cheat sheet is allowed for the quizzes.
Suggest homework for Section 9.9:  problems 1-34 (eventually).  As of April 8, you should be able to do problems with sin, cos and exp.
Suggested homework for Section 9.3:  problems 1-32.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 13, from 4:30 to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on April 14 are based on Section 9.3 and 9.9.  An 8.5 inch by 11 inch cheat sheet is allowed.  In 9.9, focus on problems that involve sin, cos, and exp.
Suggested homework for 9.9 and 9.10:  you should be able to do 1-32 of 9.9 and 1-16 of 9.10.  In class we used Theorems 19 and 20 (pages 541-542 of Section 7) to differentiate and integrate power series and thus get some series for ln and for the inverse tangent function.  Problem 15 of 9.10 asks you to get series for the inverse sine and inverse cosine functions in a similar manner.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 20, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on Monday, April 21, cover 9.4 and 9.10.  The usual cheat sheet is allowed.  In 9.4 study problems 1-36.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, April 27, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on Monday, April 28, cover Sections 9.5 and 9.6.  Study problems 1-44 in 9.5 and 1-44 in 9.6.  The usual cheat sheet is allowed.
Suggested homework for Section 9.7:  problems 1-44.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:  I'll be on the 4th floor of Keller to answer questions on Sunday, May 4, from 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm.  The quizzes on Monday, May 5, cover Section 9.7 and the three formulas for error estimation.  You can bring a one-page cheat sheet as before; with the quizzes there will be provided copies of the summaries of theorems about series (the same summary that was distributed in class).
Office Hours (for visiting without an appointment)
tentatively:  MWF 10:30-11:20

CitizenshipLogic | Credit by Exam 
International Student Service | Math Department

Essays

Shark Attacks in Hawaii (posted 12/12/2013)
(Traditional) Exact Confidence Intervals for the Binomial Distribution
(posted 4/5/2005, pdf format; revised very slightly, 5/6/2011; mahalo to Hong Zhang for a careful reading)
Convexity of the Binomial Distribution
(posted 4/5/2005, pdf format)
How Not To Define Surface Area:   an 1890 Example Due to H. A. Schwartz   (posted 11/08/2004, in pdf format). I learned this example from T. W. Korner's book, "A Companion to Analysis", page 218. Schwartz produced a simple triangulation of a cylinder for which the sum of the areas of the triangles converges to any chosen number greater than the true surface area, or even converges to infinity.
New!  How many people have ever lived?  Keyfitz's computation is updated. This page on demography was written at the behest of Prof. Glen Paige for his new book, "Non-Killing Political Science."

 

Youth Economics

Relative to male high school graduates, the college wage premium soared from 35 percent to 93 percent between 1973 and 1992 (page 177, The Future of Capitalism, by Lester Thurow).

However, the standard deviations are also quite large:

"During the peak earning years of forty-five to fifty-four years of age, 26 percent of all white males with bachelor's degrees will earn less than the median white male high school graduate and 21 percent of al white male high school graduates will earn more than the median white male with a bachelor's degree (page 282, The Future of Capitalism, by Lester Thurow).

Social Security Reform

Perhaps the most responsible review of social security issues is "The Coming Generational Storm" by Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Scott Burns. Here is an outline of their proposal, from page 156:
  • The accrual of additional Social Security retirement benefits is eliminated. Ramsey's paraphrase: immediately stop making new unfunded promises but keep all the old promises.
  • Current retirees and current workers receive their accrued Social Security retirement benefits. Ramsey's paraphrase: old promises are kept.
  • Social Security's Old Age Insurance (OAI) payroll tax is eliminated and replaced with equivalent compulsory contributions to PSS accounts. Ramsey's paraphrase: mandatory personal savings accounts are set up to take care of new retirement needs of new workers, with no change in take-home pay.
  • A new federal retail sales tax is used to pay off the accrued retirement benefits owed under the old system. Ramsey's paraphrase: the money to keep the old promises must come from somewhere.
  • Workers' PSS contributions are shared fifty-fifty with their spouses.
  • The government contributes to PSS accounts on behalf of disabled and unemployed.
  • The government matches PSS contributions on a progressive basis.
  • All PSS balances are invested in a single market-weighted global index fund of stocks, bonds and real estate.
  • The government guarantees the real principle that workers contribute to their PSS accounts. Ramsey's note: real means growing enough to match inflation.
  • Between ages 57 and 67, workers' PSS balances are gradually sold off and transformed into inflation-protected pensions.
  • If a worker dies prior to age 67, any remaining PSS balances would be transferred to PSS accounts of the worker's heirs.

Kotlikoff and Burns personally believe that there is no chance that Congress will implement a reform plan such as this, but they offer the plan as proof that we don't have to let a financial crisis happen.